New York Historical Context of Space and Buildings – The New York Genealogical and Biographical Society founding

Some photos that I had taken of a building in New York City that at one time housed the Genealogical Society . . .

00 - cricketdiane10 - NY - Day 5 - New York Genealogical and Biographical Society 004-2

The building for the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society Library and Headquarters at 122 East 58th Street New York City was built in 1928 - cricketdiane photo 2010

Over the doorway of this building is a stone-cut placard for the New York Genealogical Society. It appears over the doorway in the center of the photo’s view but to the left of what appears to be the main entrance.

Looking up at the entire building facade, I took another photo to look up the building and the Society later. I was very excited to have found it. Apparently, the Society was originally created in 1869 and chartered in 1870. It was willing to allow women to be members and is the second oldest Genealogical Society founded in the United States. The oldest is the one in New England.

A second photo of the entire building facade from the street –

00 - cricketdiane10 - NY - Day 5 - New York Genealogical and Biographical Society building from 1928 003-2

This elegant building facade highlights several distinct architectural elements from arched window casings and flourishes to the stone of its base and little windows beside the doors with diamond paneled and probably beveled windows. cricketdiane photo 2010

From the wikipedia entry, I noted a couple things immediately –

The New York Genealogical and Biographical Society was organized on the evening of February 27, 1869, by seven gentlemen meeting at the home of Dr. David Parsons Holton in New York City.

A caption under the photo provided says this –

The former G&B Library and Headquarters at 122 East 58th Street; the building was built in 1928.

And on the first line of the entry is indicated that its location is currently somewhere else –

The New York Genealogical and Biographical Society (NYGBS) is a non-profit educational institution located at 36 West 44th Street in New York City. Founded in 1869, it is the second-oldest genealogical society in the United States. Its purpose is to collect and make available information on genealogy, biography, and history, particularly as it relates to the people of New York State. The Society also publishes periodicals and books, conducts educational programs, maintains a Committee on Heraldry, and offered several other services.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_Genealogical_and_Biographical_Society

New York Genealogical and Biographical Society building, 122 East 58th Street New York - built in 1928

This had been the main library and headquarters for the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society 59 years after their inception in February of 1869. It is the second oldest genealogical society in the United States and includes a section on heraldry and history. - from wikipedia

When I was in New York, I took a photo of the placard which had been cut into what appears to be marble. It is not as clear as I would’ve liked, but it was taken to remind me to look it up when I came home, because both the building and the genealogical society were so exciting to find . . .

00 - cricketdiane10 - NY - Day 5 - New York Genealogical and Biographical Society marble inscription 002-2

This photo that I took while in New York shows a space for a cartouche or seal for the society along with the placard announcing the headquarters and original library for the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society.

It isn’t clear if the words were inscribed into the marble or set upon it in this photograph, however, it does look like at one time there had been a seal on the door. The stonework at the base of the building is massive and incredibly done. The columns in the facade are in bas relief and the windows at the top of the arched brick spaces actually have a curved upper casing on them which is very expensive and very unusual. There is a mansard roof and along the upper floor, it seems there is a walkway or thin balcony with intricately detailed stone spindles. A medallion flourish in stone sets above the upper windows like a globe of the world with silk banners made in stone coming from it. On either side of the top gallery windows, there is a specialized design created in the bricks with a diamond pattern set into a square made of the brickwork itself.

A quick google search to get some context – 1869 when the genealogical society was created was four years after the end of the Civil War and the assassination of President Lincoln.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Civil_War

The American Civil War (1861–1865), also known as the War Between the States (among other names), [ . . . ]

(and)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assassination_of_Abraham_Lincoln

United States President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated on April 14, 1865, as the American Civil War was drawing to a close, just five days after the surrender of the commanding general of the Confederate army, Robert E. Lee, and his battered Army of Northern Virginia to General Ulysses S. Grant‘s Union forces. Lincoln was shot while watching a play at Ford’s Theatre in Washington, D.C., and died the next morning. (General Grant and his wife were to be at the theater and at her insistence did not go, my note).

(and this from a timeline for New York from 1860 – 1921)

**

1860

1865

  • 31 January. Congress passes the Thirteenth Amendment, which abolishes slavery.
  • 4 March. Lincoln is inaugurated for his second term; his “Second Inaugural” speech is justly famous for its appeal to bind up the wounds of the nation.
  • 8 April. Civil War officially ends when Lee surrenders to Grant at Appomattox Court House. The terms are generous: Confederate soldiers may keep their side arms and possessions, and Grant orders 25,000 rations to be distributed. The terms are written for the men’s signatures by Colonel Eli Parker, a Seneca Indian on Grant’s staff (Ward 379). The Army of Northern Virginia formally surrenders three days later.
  • 14 April. While watching Our American Cousin at Ford’s Theater, Lincoln is shot by John Wilkes Booth and dies the following day.

1866

  • 30 April. Congress passes the Civil Rights Bill of 1866.
  • First appearance of a 5-cent coin, soon called “the nickel.”

1867

  • 31 January. All males over 21 are granted suffrage in US territories
  • 2 March. First Reconstruction Act passed over the president’s veto; the second is passed on March 23.
  • 30 March. Secretary of State Seward purchases Alaska from Russia  for $7.2 million.  Congressional critics call this “Seward’s Folly.”

1868

  • 13 March-6 May. Impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson ends in his acquittal.
  • Custer moves against Chief Black Kettle, destroying an Indian village and all its inhabitants.
  • 28 July. Ratification of the Fourteenth Amendment grants full citizenship to all (including African Americans) born in the US except Native Americans.
  • 3 November. Ulysses S. Grant and his vice-presidential candidate, Schuyler Colfax, are elected by a landslide.

1869

  • Ulysses S. Grant becomes president (1869-77).
  • 10 May. Union Pacific-Central Pacific transcontinental railroad is completed as the two lines meet at Promontory Point, Utah.
  • Wyoming passes first woman’s suffrage act.
  • Susan B. Anthony elected president of the American Equal Rights Association.
  • Number of justices on the Supreme Court rises from 7 to 9.
  • Elizabeth Cady Stanton elected president of the National Woman Suffrage Association, which demands federal voting rights for women.
  • First Sioux War ends with the Treaty of Fort Laramie; the US agrees to abandon Forts Smith, Kearney, and Reno.
  • 24 September. Earlier in the year, Jay Gould and Jay Fisk attempted to drive up the price of gold and corner the market.  On this day, “Black Friday,”  President Grant releases $4 million and drives the price down, an action that causes a stock-market panic.

http://www.wsu.edu/~campbelld/amlit/1860.htm

(and this little bit from another timeline -)

1869 Wyoming passes the first law in the United States giving women the right to vote

1871 Yellowstone Park is created. Pressed by a growing agitation for the conservation of the badly exploited natural resources of the country, Congress begins to reverse its wholesale giveaway programs and creates the park as a public preserve in Wyoming.

1874 The Womenís Christian Temperance Union is formed.

1876 Frederick Law Olmsted completes the Central Park in New York City.

1878 The Women’s Suffrage Amendment is introduced into Congress.

1881 President Hayes, whose wife is nicknamed Lemonade Lucy because she serves no alcohol in the White House, decrees that no alcoholic beverages are to be sold at military posts.

1881 James Garfield is inaugurated president, and Chester A. Arthur becomes vice president.

1881 James Garfield is assassinated by a madman named Charles Guiteau.

1881 Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute is founded by Booker T. Washington. At Tuskegee Washington advocates an education limited to vocational skills, and from this base,Washington rises to national prominence.

1885 The American Economic Association is established. A number of young economists have become disillusioned with the premises standing behind the philosophy of laissez-faire. The organization is the first economic group to argue that the state must contribute actively in the way of “positive aid” to the just progress of its citizens. These economists contend that unless concerted efforts are made to prevent further degradation of the new class of workers, the American dream will turn into a nightmare of class warfare. Woodrow Wilson and Henry Adams are among the 186 founding members.

1887 The Interstate Commerce Act is passed by Congress and signed into law. A five man commission is created to see that rates are just and “reasonable;” to forbid double-tiered rates for long and short hauls on freight carriers; to stop discriminatory rates between competitive and non-competitive localities and to stop the practice of pooling.

1888 Congress establishes a Department of Labor.

1888 Benjamin Harrison is elected president of the United States, and Levi Morton becomes vice president.

1889 Frederick Winslow Taylor develops his principles of scientific management. His book, The Principles of Scientific Management (1911) is widely read by managers.

1890 The National Womenís Suffrage Association and the American Women’s Suffrage Association, both formed in 1869, merge to consolidate the women’s suffrage movement.

1890 Sherman Anti-trust Act is passed. It makes illegal “every contract, combination in the form of trust or otherwise, or conspiracy, in restraint of trade or commerce among the several states, or with foreign nations.”

1893 President Cleveland is inaugurated for a second term.

1895 U.S. v. E.C. Knight Co. The Supreme Court finds that the Sherman Anti-Trust Act is applicable only to monopolies involved in interstate trade. Ruling that a sugar combine is beyond the law, the Court draws a fine line between manufacturing and commerce. This ruling temporarily renders the Sherman Anti-Trust Act, which had been designed to regulate all forms of trusts, useless.

1896 McKinley wins the presidential election. Garret Hobart is vice president.

1900 McKinley wins a second term as president. Theodore Roosevelt is vice president.

1901 President McKinley is shot by Anarchist Leon Czolgosz as he attends a reception in Buffalo. He dies a week later of his wounds.

1902 Publication of Ida Tarbellís muckraking exposé, The History of the Standard Oil Company. Along with other such publications as Frank Norris’ The Octopus, Lincoln Steffens’ The Shame of the Cities, journalists will have a direct impact on the course of political action.

1904 Northern Securities Co. v. U. S.  The Supreme Court finds that the company violates the Sherman Anti-Trust Act. This is the first case that Roosevelt has undertaken in his campaign to bring big business within the restraint of law.

1904 Theodore Roosevelt is elected president. Charles W. Fairbanks becomes vice president.

1906 Meat Inspection Act and Pure Food and Drug Act are  passed by Congress, largely due to the of Upton Sinclairís muckraking book, The Jungle.

1908 William Howard Taft is elected president, and James S. Sherman is vice president.

1909 The NAACP is founded by W.E.B. DuBois.

1912 Woodrow Wilson is elected president, and Thomas R. Marshall becomes vice president.

1913 The 16th Amendment to the Constitution is adopted by the nation, providing the necessary legal basis for a graduated income tax.

1913 The Owen-Glass Federal Reserve Act is passed. It creates 12 regional Federal Reserve Banks, and all national banks are forced to join the system. A Federal Reserve Board is created to manage the new network.

1916 Woodrow Wilson is reelected for a second term. Thomas Marshall is vice president.

1916 The Keating-Owen Act, limiting child labor, is passed by Congress, but the Supreme Court declares the Act unconstitutional in Hammer v. Dagenhart (1918).

1920 The 19th Amendment to the Constitution, giving women suffrage, is enacted.

(AND the infamous Prohibition Act which outlawed alcohol – )

1919 The 18th Amendment to the Constitution is passed, instituting the Prohibition of alcohol. The Volstead Act will be passed to enforce Prohibition.

(from a progressivism and populism focused timeline of the years during which the New York Genealogical Society was formed)

http://www.pinzler.com/ushistory/timeline8.html

(there are a lot more entries and it is all very fascinating actually, my note)

**

A bit more from the entry in wikipedia about the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society building – including a note about the fact that the statue of Christopher Columbus in New York was commissioned and placed by the Society.

When I was studying many of the Clubs which had formed in New York around the same time period – 1869 (more or less), General Grant’s name appears on many of the membership lists, among others which is also very interesting about New York City at the time.

The Society’s first permanent home was at Mott Memorial Hall, a house at 64 Madison Avenue. In 1888 the Society obtained space in the Berkeley Lyceum Building at 19 West 41st Street, and two years later moved to the new Berkeley Lyceum building at 23 West 44th Street. In 1891 Mrs. Elizabeth Underhill Coles died, leaving the Society a bequest of $20,000. With this money the Society was able to purchase in 1896 a four-story brownstone at 226 West 58th Street, between Broadway and Seventh Avenue. This became Genealogical Hall, the home of the Society for the next 33 years.

The Society’s former building held many mementos of Genealogical Hall. There was a plaque in the lobby commemorating Mrs. Coles’ gift, and the library was graced by a beautiful stained-glass window which was presented to the Society by the Record Committee in 1898. The window was installed in the Library until 1929 and then languished in storage until 1992, when it was carefully restored and installed in a north window of the library, largely due to the generosity of then president Henry S. Middendorf.

One of the Society’s most ambitious early projects was the erection of a statue of Christopher Columbus on the Mall in New York’s Central Park. The statue was unveiled in 1894 as part of the Columbus quadricentennial, and it can still be seen in the Park today.[1]

(from : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_Genealogical_and_Biographical_Society )

When I was in New York, I took a number of pictures of the statue of Christopher Columbus which was amazing to me and then to find out that these are the people responsible for it existing at all – truly amazing. I was totally wrong – this one is Columbus Circle –

Here is one of the pictures I took of the statue when I was there  –

Statue of Christopher Columbus in New York City, Columbus Circle by Time Warner Center - cricketdiane photo 2010 - not the one commissioned by the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society in 1894

Statue of Christopher Columbus in New York City, Columbus Circle by Time Warner Center - cricketdiane photo 2010 - not the one commissioned by the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society in 1894 as I had thought.

Because I was there during the holiday season around Thanksgiving, I was able to get this wonderful photograph of the statue from the arcade windows of Time Warner Center with its beautiful artistic star diamonds hanging in the atrium –

cricketdiane10 - NY Day 2-3 Statue of Christopher Columbus seen from Times Warner atrium 032-2

The view of Christopher Columbus stands sentinel in the Columbus Circle space beyond the Times Warner Center atrium - cricketdiane photo 2010

***

cricketdiane10 - NY Day 2-3 Statue of Christopher Columbus seen from Times Warner atrium 032-2

The view of Christopher Columbus stands sentinel in the Central Park space beyond the Times Warner Center atrium - cricketdiane photo 2010

One of the Society’s most ambitious early projects was the erection of a statue of Christopher Columbus on the Mall in New York’s Central Park. The statue was unveiled in 1894 as part of the Columbus quadricentennial, and it can still be seen in the Park today.[1]

(and that statue is not it either – see near the end of this post for more information about both sculptures.)

(from entry in wikipedia about the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society)

***

A little more about the time period when the Society was formed – this from the owner of the largest New York newspaper of the time – a fairly sensationalist news paper, however it did fund the 1869 expedition to Africa and another to the North Pole –

Bennett was educated primarily in France. In 1866, the elder Bennett turned control of the Herald over to him. Bennett raised the paper’s profile on the world stage when he provided the financial backing for the 1869 expedition by Henry Morton Stanley into Africa to find David Livingstone in exchange for the Herald having the exclusive account of Stanley’s progress.

He was a co-founder of the Commercial Cable Company, a venture to break the Transatlantic cable monopoly held by Jay Gould.

Settling in Paris, (it doesn’t mention what year, my note),  he launched the Paris edition of the New York Herald, titled The Paris Herald, the forerunner of the International Herald Tribune.

He backed George W. DeLong‘s voyage to the North Pole via the Bering Strait. The ill-fated expedition led to the starvation deaths of DeLong and 19 of his crew, a tragedy that only increased the paper’s circulation.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Gordon_Bennett,_Jr.

(my note – sounds about like the National Geographic Society, I wonder when that was created – I’ll look it up . . . )

James Gordon Bennett, Jr. (May 10, 1841 – May 14, 1918) was publisher of the New York Herald, founded by his father, James Gordon Bennett, Sr., who immigrated from Scotland. He was generally known as Gordon Bennett to distinguish him from his father.[1]

New York, New York map Date 1894 timeline Building Type corporate headquaters Climate temperate Context urban Style Renaissance Revival Notes

Photo, exterior overview, historical

based on the Palazzo del Lonsiglio in Verona, Italy.

http://www.greatbuildings.com/buildings/New_York_Herald_Building.html

Gordon Bennett's New York Herald Building in New York City designed by the architects McKim, Mead and White 1894

in New York City today, the statue and owls from the top of this building designed in 1895 for the Herald Newspaper's company headquarters now reside in the triangular park called Herald Square. It is part of the environment where the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society was originally formed and influenced to go forward with their mission.

Under Bennett’s son, James Gordon Bennett, Jr., the paper financed Henry Morton Stanley‘s expeditions into Africa to find David Livingstone, where they met on November 10, 1871.[3] The paper also supported Stanley’s trans-Africa exploration, and in 1879 supported the ill-fated expedition of George W. DeLong to the arctic region.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_Herald

***

There is more about the Genealogical Society creating the building which is in the pictures I took in New York – Hmmmm……..

By 1912 Genealogical Hall was already inadequate to hold the library, and the Trustees decided to try to raise $65,000 to acquire the adjacent building lot for expansion. J. Pierpont Morgan contributed $10,000 on the condition that the Society raise the remainder, and this was accomplished by the end of 1913, mainly through the efforts of president Clarence Winthrop Bowen. Various factors intervened to prevent the proposed expansion, and Mr. Bowen was still president 16 years later when the Society moved across town into its former building at 122-124-126 East 58th Street.

The new facility, erected at a cost of $300,000, replaced three brownstone houses on the site. It was designed by the noted New York architectural firm of La Farge, Warren and Clark. The formal dedication on December 11, 1929, was attended by an impressive list of dignitaries, headed by former President of the United States Calvin Coolidge and former Governor of New York and Secretary of State (and future Chief Justice of the United States) Charles Evans Hughes.

The new building provided impressive and ample space for the growth of the library. Over the years the Society had also expanded its publications program. By 1929 each issue of the Record ran over 100 pages, and it had become recognized as one of the leading scholarly journals of genealogy. Since 1890 the Society had also published several volumes of its Collections, starting with the marriage and baptismal registers of New York State’s oldest church, the Reformed Dutch Church of New Amsterdam and New York City.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_Genealogical_and_Biographical_Society

**

Some interesting bits of information from the wikipedia page including where the materials ended up being donated to the New York Public Library and where the current offices for the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society are located –

When the Society was founded in 1869, the only New Yorkers who had an interest in tracing their roots, or the time to do so, were those whose lineages stretched back to the colonial period, and the Society for its first hundred years catered almost exclusively to that part of the population. Even among those with colonial ancestry, however, there were relatively few who had more than a passing interest in their family history. Genealogy remained a rather obscure hobby and its status as a profession was even more tenuous.

In the mid-1990s genealogy began to undergo a “sea change” with the advent of the Internet. The numbers of people who were pursuing genealogy skyrocketed as a result.[citation needed] The Society joined this new world in December 1998 when it launched its own website, nygbs.org (now newyorkfamilyhistory.org). It has been immensely popular and has brought many new members to the organization, particularly after the Society contracted with ProQuest to give members home access to The New York Times and HeritageQuest Online. The site has been completely redesigned twice since its inauguration, and will continue to be updated and expanded.

The wonderful old building was showing its age and in need of major rehabilitation and upgrades. This reality, combined with the ongoing decline in patron visits, brought the Board of Trustees to the difficult, but forward looking decision to sell the building and combine our wonderful library collection with that of the New York Public Library. The building was sold to one of our tenants in November 2007 and in September 2008 the bulk of our collection was transferred to the Public Library’s Irma & Paul Milstein Division of United States History, Local History, and Genealogy, thus instantly transforming that collection into the premiere repository for New York genealogical research. Much of the G&B collection is already available and the entire collection should be fully cataloged and available for inspection by fall 2010.

Accordingly, the Society’s membership no longer has voting rights on the organization’s plans and direction. Plans for the future of the library and collections were announced in July, 2008.

The Society’s library of 75,000 published works, 30,000 manuscripts, 22,000 microforms, 1,300 periodicals and digital computer media were to be donated to the New York Public Library (NYPL).[2]

The new location of the Society’s headquarters was thereafter announced as 36 West 44th Street, in the Bar Building.

The building experienced brief infamy in 1991 as being the unfortunate site where musician Eric Claptons son Conor died, having fallen onto the roof from the 53rf floor of the Galleria condominiom complex on East 57th street.

(from)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_Genealogical_and_Biographical_Society

***

More about the original architects of the building at 122 East 58th Street in New York that was built in 1928 –

New York architectural firm of La Farge, Warren and Clark

http://diglib.princeton.edu/ead/getEad?eadid=C0688&kw=

Biography of C. Grant La Farge

Christopher Grant La Farge was the eldest son of the artist John LaFarge, famous especially for his stained glass panels. La Farge and George Lewis Heins met at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and trained together in the Boston offices of Henry Hobson Richardson. In 1886 they opened their office, Heins & La Farge. Heins was the man on the site; LaFarge was the principal designer. Their firm is probably best known for its plans for original sections of the Cathedral St. John the Divine in New York City. LaFarge, a fellow of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) often served on advisory committees for the schools of architecture at Columbia University, M.I.T. and Princeton University, and also as trustee and secretary for the American Academy in Rome.

Also includes on this page a description of the collection of drawings available for researchers – (my note)

The collection consists of approximately 5000 early 20th-century American architectural drawings (blueprint and trace drawings), primarily by C. Grant La Farge and various firms with which he was associated, including Heins & La Farge, La Farge, Clark & Creighton, La Farge, Warren & Clark, La Farge & Morris, and La Farge & Son. There are also groups of drawings by the architects Wilson Eyre, Pennington Satterthwaite (Princeton Class of 1893), Robert Gibson, and a few miscellaneous firms.

La Farge’s drawings (1896-1931) represent churches, homes, instituions, boathouses, and mausoleums, including plans for the Cathedral of St. John the Divine (New York City), St. Matthews Cathedral (Washington, D.C.), the U.S. Naval Hospital (Brooklyn), Caspar Whitney’s home in Irvington, N.Y., and J. P. Morgan, Jr.’s home in Matinecock Point, N.Y. For Wilson Eyre, a noted Philadelphia architect, there are drawings (1903-1932) for Walter Jefford’s house in Conn., and various other buildings. Satterthwaite’s works (1901-1927) include architectural plans for the Princeton Club (New York City), the Nassau Club (Princeton), the boathouse at Princeton University, and A. C. Hencken’s home in Greenwich, Conn. Also present are drawings and prints used by Robert W. Gibson in the competition for the plans of the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in N.Y., and miscellaneous drawings by Carrere & Hastings, D. H. Faia, Robert Walters, C. P. Gilbert, and others.

from –

http://diglib.princeton.edu/ead/getEad?eadid=C0688&kw=

My Note –

Is that the same one as the designers for the building I photographed which belonged to the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society? Hmmmm……

Need to find out more.

**

Here is some about his father – and yes, among the listings of architecture firms where Christopher Grant LaFarge was a member, the firm that designed the New York Genealogical Society headquarters is among them . . .

There was a stained glass mentioned in the text from wikipedia about the Society which at one point was rescued from one location and brought forward to another. Wonder if it could have been a work by the architect’s father – John LaFarge? Wonder if I could find a picture of it. Now I really want to see it and there are some of the other LaFarge windows on this wikipedia entry about him – They are magnificent – with themes of wisdom and justice and truth. As it turns out, his mother was the great granddaughter of Benjamin Franklin?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_LaFarge

His eldest son, Christopher Grant LaFarge, was a partner in the New York-based architectural firm of Heins & LaFarge, responsible for projects in Beaux-Arts style, notably the original Byzantine Cathedral of St. John the Divine, the Yale undergraduate society St. Anthony Hall (extant 1893-1913) pictured at,[6] and the original Astor Court buildings of the Bronx Zoo.

from the first few paragraphs about John LaFarge –

John La Farge (March 31, 1835 – November 14, 1910) was an American painter, muralist, stained glass window maker, decorator, and writer.

Born in New York City, New York, his interest in art began during his training at Mount St. Mary’s University[1] and St. John’s College (now Fordham University). He had only the study of law in mind until he returned from his first visit to Paris, France where he studied with Thomas Couture and became acquainted with famous literary people of the city. LaFarge subsequently studied with painter William Morris Hunt in Newport.[2][3] Even LaFarge’s earliest drawings and landscapes, done in Newport, Rhode Island, after his marriage in 1861 to Margaret Mason Perry, sister-in-law of Lilla Cabot Perry, show marked originality, especially in the handling of color values, and also the influence of Japanese art, in the study of which he was a pioneer.

Between 1859 and 1870, he illustrated Tennyson‘s Enoch Arden and Robert Browning‘s Men and Women. Breadth of observation and structural conception, and a vivid imagination and sense of color are shown by his mural decorations. His first work in mural painting was done in Trinity Church, Boston, in 1873. Then followed his decorations in the Church of the Ascension (the large altarpiece) and St. Paul’s Chapel (Columbia University), New York. For the Minnesota State Capitol at St. Paul he executed, at age 71, four great lunettes representing the history of law, and for the Supreme Court building at Baltimore, a similar series with Justice as the theme. In addition there are his vast numbers of other paintings and water colors, notably those recording his extensive travels in the Orient and South Pacific.

The work of art shown is a 1901 work by John LaFarge (1835-1910). "Figure of Wisdom," stained glass window in Unity Church, North Easton, MA. Photo credit:  Daniel P. B. Smith, 2005 (wikipedia entry on John LaFarge)

The work of art shown is a 1901 work by John La Farge (1835-1910). "Figure of Wisdom," stained glass window in Unity Church, North Easton, MA. Photo credit: Daniel P. B. Smith, 2005 (wikipedia entry on John La Farge)

One of the LaFarge windows shown on the wikipedia page entry about him – John LaFarge’s eldest son Christopher was a member of the firm who did the architectural designs for the Genealogical Society headquarters.

La Farge experimented with color problems, especially in the medium of stained glass. He succeeded not only in rivaling the gorgeousness of medieval windows, but in adding new resources by his invention of opalescent glass and his original methods of superimposing and welding his material.

Among his many stained glass masterpieces are:

(That would be the father, artist and master stained glass guy)

This part would give reference to the son’s efforts – (describes his family from the wikipedia entry about his master artist father) –

He, [John LaFarge] married on October 15, 1860 at Newport, Rhode Island, Margaret Mason Perry, who was born on February 26, 1839 in Newport, Rhode Island, and died on May 2, 1925.

Her father was Christopher Grant Perry, the son of Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry and Elizabeth Champlin Mason. He was a descendant of Gov. Thomas Prence (1599 – March 29, 1673) a co-founder of Eastham, Massachusetts, a political leader in both the Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay colonies, and governor of Plymouth (1634, 1638, and 1657–1673); and Elder William Brewster (pilgrim), (c. 1567 – April 10, 1644), the Pilgrim leader and spiritual elder of the Plymouth Colony and a passenger on the Mayflower.

Her mother was Frances Sergeant, who was the daughter of Chief Justice Thomas Sergeant and Sarah Bache, the daughter of Sarah Franklin Bache and Richard Bache. She was a great-granddaughter of Benjamin Franklin, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States of America and Deborah Read.

His eldest son, Christopher Grant LaFarge, was a partner in the New York-based architectural firm of Heins & LaFarge, responsible for projects in Beaux-Arts style, notably the original Byzantine Cathedral of St. John the Divine, the Yale undergraduate society St. Anthony Hall (extant 1893-1913) pictured at,[6] and the original Astor Court buildings of the Bronx Zoo. [“the various firms with which he, (Christopher Grant LaFarge), was associated, including Heins & La Farge, La Farge, Clark & Creighton, La Farge, Warren & Clark, La Farge & Morris, and La Farge & Son.” –  from Princeton Library site – see below.]

His son Oliver Hazard Perry LaFarge I became an architect and real estate developer. Part of his career in real estate was in a Seattle partnership with Marshall Latham Bond, Bond & LaFarge. During the year 1897 to 1898 Seattle real estate which had been extremely prosperous was in a “slump”. The partners left and participated in the Klondike Gold Rush. Among the camp fire mates at Dawson City during the Fall of 1897 was Jack London who rented a tent site from Marshall Bond. In Seattle the Perry Building designed after LaFarge returned is still standing. Later on in life O.H.P. LaFarge designed buildings for General Motors.

Another of his sons, John LaFarge, S.J., became a Jesuit priest and a strong supporter of anti-racist policies.

from wikipedia entry about John LaFarge found here –

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_LaFarge

The collection consists of approximately 5000 early 20th-century American architectural drawings (blueprint and trace drawings), primarily by C. Grant La Farge and various firms with which he was associated, including Heins & La Farge, La Farge, Clark & Creighton, La Farge, Warren & Clark, La Farge & Morris, and La Farge & Son. There are also groups of drawings by the architects Wilson Eyre, Pennington Satterthwaite (Princeton Class of 1893), Robert Gibson, and a few miscellaneous firms.

from – (the Description of the Contents in their Collection) – found here –

http://diglib.princeton.edu/ead/getEad?eadid=C0688&kw=

***

The New York-based architectural firm of Heins & La Farge, composed of Philadelphia-born architect George Lewis Heins (1860–1907) and Christopher Grant La Farge (1862–1938) – the eldest son of the artist John LaFarge, famous especially for his stained glass panels – were responsible most notably for the original Romanesque-Byzantine east end and crossing of the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, New York, and for the original Astor Court buildings of the Bronx Zoo, which formed a complete ensemble reflecting the esthetic of the City Beautiful movement.

Heins & La Farge provided the architecture and details for the Interborough Rapid Transit, the first subway system of New York.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heins_%26_LaFarge

cricketdiane10 - 11-28-10 - Day 6 - New York Life Insurance Company Building sits atop the Interborough Subway Station 094-2

The photograph I had taken of the Interborough Subway sign at the New York Life Insurance Company building whose details were created by the Heins and La Farge architecture firm. This overall building was designed by Cass Gilbert with the Interborough Subway details provided by the LaFarge team - cricketdiane photo New York City 2010

(see the previous post for more information about the New York Life Insurance Building which sits atop the original site for Madison Square Garden and contains the subway station for the oldest New York subway – the Interborough Subway)

***

In 1899, Heins was appointed New York State architect by Governor Theodore Roosevelt, and he designed interiors for the first buildings at the State University of New York, Albany: the Auditorium and the Science and Administration Buildings.[2] He held that position until his death in 1907. While serving in that capacity his office designed the Flushing Armory, Geneva Armory, Gloversville Armory, Medina Armory, and Oneonta Armory.

La Farge, a fellow of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) often served on advisory committees for the schools of architecture at Columbia University, M.I.T. and Princeton University, and also as trustee and secretary for the American Academy in Rome.

Roosevelt was also a prime mover behind the creation of the New York Zoological Society, for whom the partners designed the original nucleus of buildings (1899–1910, now called the Astor Court) as a series of pavilions symmetrically grouped round the large sea lion pool, all in a sturdy brick and limestone Roman Ionic and Doric, with the heads of elephants and rhinos, lions and zebras projecting festively from panels and friezes. The central Administration Building (1910), offering an arched passageway to the zoo’s outdoor spaces, has complicated domed spaces formed of Guastavino tile.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heins_%26_LaFarge

(there’s bunches more, but I want to know about the firm in place when the building at the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society was built.)

They also designed a “Romanesque dollhouse” on the Yale campus for the fraternity Delta Psi – a building which no longer exists since being demolished in 1913.

University commissions were also in their oeuvre. At Yale, their rusticated Richardsonian Romanesque design for a chapter building of St. Anthony Hall, also known as the Delta Psi fraternity, stood from 1894 to 1913.

(from wikipedia entry – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heins_%26_LaFarge )

The building was razed when Frederick Vanderbilt gave money for a new St. A’s designed to blend with the Sheffield dormitories he had funded on either side of the fraternity.

http://www.yalealumnimagazine.com/issues/01_03/popup/landmarks/22.html

Yale's Lost Landmarks - Saint Anthony Hall 1894 - 1913 designed by Heins & LaFarge - photo from Yale Alumni Magazine

Yale's Lost Landmarks - Saint Anthony Hall 1894 - 1913 designed by Heins & La Farge - photo from Yale Alumni Magazine - Demolished by Frederick Vanderbilt's gift of money to build another in keeping with the designs of the other frat halls nearby

***

For brilliant photos of the New York City Hall Subway Station designed by Heins & LaFarge – this site explains how to see it and holds some gorgeous pictures of the elegantly designed station. Beautiful tile work, arched ceilings and lighting (including this note about the skylights from their website – )

Vault lights permitted sunlight into City Hall Station. This light was augmented by wrought iron chandeliers hanging from the vault ceiling.

http://www.forgotten-ny.com/SUBWAYS/City%20Hall%20Station/cityhall.html

(Definitely pop over and see their photos – absolutely brilliant.)

**

Some information from this book on google books yields more information about La Farge, Warren & Clark NY architecture –

Long Island country houses and their architects, 1860-1940

By Robert B. MacKay, Anthony K. Baker, Carol A. Traynor (1997)

Long Island Country Houses and Their Architects, 1860 – 1940 (online through google books)

Christopher Grant La Farge, 1862 – 1938

In the course of his lengthy career, Christopher Grant La Farge, was associated with several partnerships: with George Louis Heins (1886 0 1907); with Benjamin Wistar Morris (1910 – 15); and after several years of practicing alone, with the firm La Farge, Warren & Clark, and its successor firm, La Farge, Clark & Creighton.

Finally, his son Christopher practiced with him in the firm of La Farge & Son. although he is better known for his work on public and ecclesiastical buildings throughout the state of New York than for his domestic work on Long Island, La Farge was, in fact, involved in the design of at least three important residences on the Island: the J.P. Morgan, Jr., house in Glen Cove (demolished 1980); the John Hay Whitney Boathouse in Manhasset; and an addition to Theodore Roosevelt’s “Sagamore Hill” in Oyster Bay.

Theodore Roosevelt Residence, “Sagamore Hill,” Oyster Bay, 1905

La Farge received his first Long Island commission from his friend, Theodore Roosevelt, after the latter’s election to a second term as President of the United States. It was to design an addition to “Sagamore Hill,” Roosevelt’s summer home at Oyster Bay. (goes on to describe it, but there is a great photograph of its interior space – absolutely amazing.)

(looks like the Yosemite lodge without the stone three story fireplace or some other great woods lodge with a library reading alcove added, my note – has deer heads, etc. – my note) The primary feature is an enlarged Ionic order that encircles the room, framing windows, doors, and fireplaces. To one side, the architects placed a small reading alcove. The coved ceiling and all the wall space were paneled in classical motifs. Roosevelt called it “the most attractive feature of my house by all odds.”

(has great photograph of that room – looks like a hunting lodge in the mountains somewhere, my note)

describes and has photographs of the residence for J.P. Morgan, Jr. at Glen Cove and the Boathouse in Manhasset, as well.

Long Island Country Houses and Their Architects, 1860 – 1940 (online through google books)

**

This is a quote from the article below it describing the sale of the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society building – it tells a little about the way it looked before the recent board and trustees dismantled it –

Dedicated in 1929, the building was designed for the society by the eminent firm of La Farge, Warren and Clark and cost $300,000. Society members fondly recall the portrait gallery in the ground-floor meeting hall where annual meetings were convened, and the paneled two-story library and fireplace on the upper floor, pictured above, where anyone in the know could comfortably while away the time poring over historic gems.

CITY ROOM; Genealogical Society’s Break From the Past Creates Lingering Pain

By ALISON LEIGH COWAN
Published: August 23, 2010

Making what they called a ”forward-looking decision,” the trustees hung a for-sale sign on the society’s longtime home at 122 East 58th Street several years ago. Then — to the shock of the society’s own members, who were still reeling from the sale — the trustees gave the society’s vast collection of scholarly books and historic papers to the New York Public Library.

{ .. . .}

He acknowledged that some aspects of overhead remained high after the sale, even though the society had fewer assets to manage. Tax returns show administrative expenses unrelated to programming totaled $535,000 in 2006, $616,000 in 2007 and $963,000 in 2008.

Tax returns for 2009, Mr. Smith’s first year in charge, are not yet available for public inspection. But Mr. Smith said that the society’s endowment now stands at about $12.2 million.

”In my back-of-the-envelope computation, I estimated the radical drop in the market that took place after the building was sold took about $6 million out of the kitty,” Mr. Smith said. [H. McKelden Smith, president of the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society since 2009.]

from –

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9907E4D61130F930A1575BC0A9669D8B63

This first article from August of last year contains two pages and a lot of information. A second article discusses the buyer in the deal and appears online at this link –

http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/08/23/a-short-second-life-for-a-building-with-history/

Starting in late 2003, he rented space on the ground floor of a five-story building owned by the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society at 122 East 58th Street. The rabbi, who spent four years working for Harry Helmsley, the late real estate tycoon, on a break from the rabbinate, said he liked that the building was within walking distance of several hotels, a selling point for observant Jews in town for the weekend and in need of a place to pray. Though the start-up was legally an affiliate of the Hampton Synagogue, the name on the door said the New York Synagogue.

(etc. – from the article link above)

**

And, now the building was sold again after that and this article had an interesting note about the Genealogical and Biographical Society of New York leasing it back and then renting the auditorium out to the group they had originally sold it to – Hmmm……

Seller Hampton Synagogue bought the 23,712-square-foot, 80-year-old building in July 2007 for $24 million from the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society, city records show. ( . . . ) After the Westhampton Beach-based synagogue sold the building in 2007, the genealogical society leased it back, then rented the auditorium to the synagogue for weekly events, said society president McKelden Smith. The genealogical organization will move this summer to a 3,000-square-foot commercial condominium it bought last fall at the Bar Building, 36 West 44th Street.

Excerpt from –

http://therealdeal.com/newyork/articles/midtown-congregation-building-sells-for-28m

***

”This is not really a financial story,” said McKelden Smith the businessman who became the society’s president in January 2009. (from New York Times story Aug 22, 2010)

http://www.coaf.us/activities10.html

photos of meeting – board of NY Genealogical and Biographical Society members including the President, H. McKelden Smith, and their Heraldry Branch member – new commercial condominium boardroom location with its high administrative costs despite few full time staff members.

http://www.newyorkfamilyhistory.org/download/public_researcher/NYResearcher2010SpringG_1.pdf

Officers and Board Members –

W. Francis Price Jr., Chairman

Robert G. Goelet, Vice-Chairman

Luke Ives Pontifell, Secretary

Robert f. Hendrickson, Treasurer

William M. Bramwell Jr., Assistant Treasurer

Elizabeth L. Bradley

R. Brandon Fradd

John C. Harvey

Elbrun Kimmelman

Anita A. Lustenberger

George H. McNeely IV

Robert S. Roberson

Henry B. Roberts

M. David Sherrill

Jeanne Sloane

McKelden Smith, Ex Officio

Waddell W. Stillman

Timothy F. Beard

Henry B. Hoff

Henry C.B. Lindh

Walter Wilmerding

E. Lisk Wyckoff

Trustees Emeriti

**

Senior Staff

McKelden Smith, President

M. Pamella Campbell, Accounts Manager

Patricia Law Hatcher, Editor: The Record

William P. Johns, Senior Advisor

Lauren Maehrlein, Director of Education

Cathy Michelsen, Director of Development

Lindsey M. Ottman, Director of Information Systems

The New York Genealogical and Biographical Society

7th floor

36 West 44th Street

New York, NY 10036-8105

mail@nygbs.org

212-755-8532

Also found on this site –

“A few days later, Lauren Maehrlein and I visited the New York Public Library’s stunning new cataloging facility in Long Island City. Melissa Yolles and Jeffrey Bayer gave us a tour of the book, manuscripts, and special formats cataloging functions and showed us the work being done on the NYG&B’s collections. The details of that effort are covered in Lauren’s article on page 4.”

(they’ve also taken on a trustee from Christie’s who had worked with Newport Historical Society)

***

So, that indicates where the actual materials are now . . .

and these two parts indicate something else about it –

in 2007, the board pushed through a resolution that stripped members of their right to vote on important business and approve the naming of trustees.

(and)

Tax returns for 2009, Mr. Smith’s first year in charge, are not yet available for public inspection. But Mr. Smith said that the society’s endowment now stands at about $12.2 million.

”In my back-of-the-envelope computation, I estimated the radical drop in the market that took place after the building was sold took about $6 million out of the kitty,” Mr. Smith said. ”That’s not atypical. We were pretty carefully invested. The money was invested in a diverse range of conservative investments, from equities to bonds to cash. So yeah, it was truly tough to lose $6 million, but everybody — individuals and organization — lost a significant amount of money. We were there with the pack.”

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9907E4D61130F930A1575BC0A9669D8B63&pagewanted=2

Looks like they got raided – as in the quasi-traditional 80’s form of corporate raiding. Any assets that could cost money to maintain were dumped and any money that could be gained from them was taken and invested in high administrative “costs” along with plowing it into a diversified stock portfolio instead. Gamblers’ Delightus Maximus is what that is . . .

Going back to my search for more information about the architects and other information from that time about the building and similar things –

**

History Window that belongs to the New York Geneological and Biographical Society

History Window that belongs to the New York Geneological and Biographical Society - had been in their building originally and then moved to their headquarters after it had languished in a storage room - was restored in 1992 and placed in the headquarters at 122 East 58th Street New York

This photograph of the History Window and this excerpt below is found in a history section about the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society – does not describe if it is a La Farge stained glass window created by the architect’s famous father or not. Seems like it might very well be, my note.

The Society’s present building holds many mementos of Genealogical Hall. There is a plaque in the lobby commemorating Mrs. Coles’ gift, and the library is graced by a beautiful stained-glass window which was presented to the Society by the Record Committee in 1898. The window was installed in the library at Genealogical Hall until 1929 and then languished in storage until 1992, when it was carefully restored and installed in a north window of the present library, largely due to the generosity of then president Henry S. Middendorf.

One of the Society’s most ambitious early projects was the erection of a statue of Christopher Columbus on the Mall in New York’s Central Park. The statue was unveiled in 1894 as part of the Columbus quadricentennial, and it can still be seen in the Park today.

http://www.newyorkfamilyhistory.org/modules.php?name=Content&pa=showpage&pid=2

1880
John LaFarge was the first designer to incorporate opalescent glass into a window and received a patent for his new product on February 24, 1880.
http://www.buffaloah.com
(from google timeline offered during a search)

**

On the W. side of the south transept is the Edwin Booth Window, given by the members of The PIayers in 1898, designed by La Farge. Just beyond
books.google.com

**

 

La Farge Welcome Window from 1909 showing at the New York American Wing of the Metropolitan Spring 2009 - maybe even today

La Farge Welcome Window from 1909 showing at the New York American Wing of the Metropolitan Spring 2009 - maybe even today

from the text it says –

John La Farge (1835–1910)

Welcome window

New York City, 1909

Painted and leaded opalescent glass

Anonymous Gift, 1944 (44.90)

http://www.curatedobject.us/the_curated_object_/2009/03/exhibitionevent-nyc-the-american-wing-galleries-open-at-the-metropolitan-museum-of-art-the-curated-o.html

I was looking for a better image of the “History Window’ that is in the care of the New York Genealogical Society. And, to see if it was a stained glass work designed by John La Farge, father of the architect who built their building along with any other details about when it was commissioned for them.

The other thing that would be interesting would be about the Christopher Columbus Statue and who sculpted it, more about the details on the building also. Apparently, from some of the text that I read, at one time there was a caretakers’ apartment within the building which was later remodeled to be offices for the Society. That is an interesting way that many buildings had a constant full time caretaker included in the structure from its time of being built onwards. The Fox Theater in Atlanta was also done that way with its recent (within the last couple years) fight to remove the caretaker from his apartment where he had spent most of his adult life living, guarding and caring for the Theater. It makes me wonder if there were any stories like that around the time that the Society changed the caretaker apartments in their building to be office space . . .

– cricketdiane

I’ll keep looking , very interesting.

***

The eagle was a natural choice for Heins & Lafarge for the 33rd Street Station since the 71st Regiment Armory was being rebuilt above the station at the time. A fire had destroyed its predecessor in 1902.

(from)

http://rogershepherd.com/WIW/solution2/72nd3.html#gustavino

The Guastavinos specialized in constructing self-supporting tile arches that were light, strong, fireproof and economical. Their beautiful thin-shell ceiling tiles grace numerous buildings including McKim, Mead and White’s Municipal Building, the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, St. Paul’s Chapel at Columbia University, the Oyster Bar at Grand Central Station, the Registry Room at Ellis Island, as well as the Elephant House of the Bronx Zoo.

The tiles of the Guastavino Fireproof Construction Company, Rafael Guastavino Sr. (1842-1908) and Rafael Guastavino Jr. (1872-1950), were fireproof, laminated tile used for wide arches that created a unique vaulted spatial effect. The major example of their use in the subway is the original City Hall station. (also were the firm that Heins and La Farge used for the Bronx Zoo, my note)

from –

http://rogershepherd.com/WIW/solution2/72nd3.html#gustavino

(has lots more pictures and descriptions of the different faience companies used for the subway stations tile work and other decorative placques like the station numbers and bas relief tiles ornamenting various places. Great page.)

It also describes when the subways started operation –

Passenger service began on October 27, 1904, from City Hall to Broadway and 145th Street, and the remaining pieces of the line were opened between November 1904 and August 1908. Each station could be clearly identified by its unique decorations in glazed ceramic, tile, and mosaics.

These pages were found from a link on this page about Christopher Grant La Farge during his participation with his firm, Heins & La Farge –

http://www.nyc-architecture.com/ARCH/ARCH-HeinsLaFarge.htm

Sealed like a tomb under City Hall Park is one of the world’s most beautiful (former) subway stations. Heins & Lafarge were the architects of this showpiece.

City Hall Station is unusually elegant in architectural style, and is unique among the original IRT stations. The platform and mezzanine feature Guastavino arches and skylights, colored glass and tilework, and brass chandeliers. The platform is spanned by a single arch with daylight filtered through every fourth bay.

In 1899, Heins was appointed New York State architect by Governor Theodore Roosevelt and he designed state buildings until his death in 1907. Lafarge, a fellow of the AIA, served, at intervals, on advisory committees for the schools of architecture at Columbia University, M.I.T. and Princeton University, and also as trustee and secretary for the American Academy in Rome.

Also I found elsewhere in a Who’s Who in America book (on google books) from 1903 – the entries for Heins, and the La Farge father and sons – including Christopher Grant La Farge

There was a note there and in another site which showed that Heins married La Farge’s sister, Aimee.

And Christopher Grant La Farge married into politics (more or less) by marrying the niece of a Sec and Senator.-

La Farge, Christopher Grant, architect; b. Newport, R.I., Jan. 5, 1862; s. John and Margaret (Perry) L.; studied Mass. Inst. Technology, 1880-1, and in office H.H. Richardson, 1882; m. Sept. 5, 1895, Florence Bayard, d. Benoni and Florence (Bayard) Lockwood, and niece Sec. and Senator Thomas F. Bayard, of Del.

Joined classmate, George L. Heins, 1882, at Minneapolis, and with latter, 1884, took charge of architectural work of his father, John La Farge, decorator; since 1886 of firm, Heins & La Farge, architects of Cathedral of St. John the Divine, interior Ch. of St. Paul the Apostle and Ch. of the Incarnation, ch. and parsonage 4th Presby’n Ch., New York, St. Matthew’s, Washington, Ch. of the Blessed Sacrament, Providence, R.I., St. Paul (and parish house), Rochester, Houghton Memorial Chapel, Wellesley, Mass., R.C. Ch. and rectory, Tuxedo, NY ; chapel and parish house St. Michael’s, Geneseo, R.C, chapel W. Point, N. Y. Lorillard and Matthiesen and Bliss Mausoleums, Woodlawn, New York, Calvin S. Brice Mausoleum; Lima, O.; alterations and extensions Grace Ch., New York, 1901; accessory bldgs., Cathedral St. John the Divine, etc. Residence: 101 E. 19th Street NY Office: 30 East 21st Street, New York.

(from)

pg. 857 of google doc / pg. 862 of actual book

Who’s who in America

By John William Leonard, Albert Nelson Marquis (1903)

http://books.google.com/books?id=4nfOl6a6QSkC&pg=RA1-PA676&lpg=RA1-PA676&dq=C+G+La+Farge&source=bl&ots=P_IDzhUG-Z&sig=Y2r4V47Hf0LU5AZ5NXsggRDAKn0&hl=en&ei=9_o7TdD5H8PLgQfQ-di_CA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=8&sqi=2&ved=0CE0Q6AEwBw#v=onepage&q&f=false

(and from page 676 of the same book –  )

Heins, George Lewis, architect; b. Philadelphia, may 24, 1869; s. John and anne Marie (Vaughn) H.; student Univ. of Pa 1877-9; grad. Mass. Inst. Technology (architecture), 1882; m. 1896, Aimee LaFarge in architect’s office, Minneapolis, 188203, St. Paul, 1883-4;

Joined his classmate, C. Grant La Farge, and then removed to New York, 1884, both serving as architectural assistants to John LaFarge, decorative artist. In 1886 formed partnership with C.G. LaFarge as Heins & LaFarge. Architects for P. E. Cathedral of St. John the Divine, New York, New York Zoological Park, Consulting architects Rapid Transit Comm’n; State architect of all N.Y State Bldgs. since 1898 Made sp’l insp’n of principal cathedrals of Old World. Residence: Mohegan, N.Y. / Office: 30 E. 21st Street, New York, and Albany. N.Y.

pg. 676

***

Very nifty.

Uh oh – two different sculptures of Columbus – Hmmm……

For the 400th anniversary of Columbus’ voyage in 1492, the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society commissioned Spanish sculptor Jeronimo Sunol (1839–1902) to fashion this bronze portrait sculpture. The statue employs religious and imperialist imagery as the explorer holds in his right hand the Spanish flag with a cross on top. At his side, a globe is mounted to a cable-entwined capstan. The statue bears similarities to Sunol’s Columbus monument installed in 1885 at the Plaza de Colon in Madrid.

The statue rests on an elaborately carved granite pedestal with numerous undercuts, bevels and moldings designed by architect Napoleon Le Brun. It complements the monuments of Shakespeare, the Indian Hunter, and Sir Walter Scott and Robert Burns installed earlier in the southern region of the Mall in Central Park.

On May 12, 1894 the statue was unveiled during a ceremony presided over by the sculpture committee’s chairman, General James Grant Wilson. The large crowd of spectators and participants included Vice President Adlai Ewing Stevenson, Mayor Thomas Francis Gilroy, Park Board President Abraham Tappen, Bishop Henry C. Potter, Italian Ambassador Baron de Fava, Spanish Minister Senor Don Muruaga, business magnate Cornelius Vanderbilt and author and social reformer Julia Ward Howe. Mr. Chauncey M. Depew, the orator for the occasion commented, “New York can add nothing to the glory of Columbus, but she may enforce the lesson of his life and discovery.” The Central Park Conservancy last refurbished the statue in 1993.

http://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/centralpark/highlights/11972

Statue of Christopher Columbus in Central Park commissioned by the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society 1894 by Spanish Sculptor Jeronimo Sunol

May 12, 1894 - Statue of Christopher Columbus in Central Park commissioned by the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society 1894 by Spanish Sculptor Jeronimo Sunol from NYC gov parks and recreation site

So, I totally had the wrong sculpture earlier in this post. Now, I’m going to have to find out what it is . . .

Oh durn.

– cricketdiane

***

What is interesting about that sculpture however, is that the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society didn’t officially form until 1869 which was 25 years before this sculpture was commissioned and installed at Central Park.

Okay – and the other sculpture of Christopher Columbus is this one -(the one I had photographed and confused with the one above – )

by Italian sculptor Gaetano Russo as part of New York's 1892 commemoration of the 4th centenary of the discovery of the America - located at Columbus Circle New York

Sculpture of Christopher Columbus by Italian sculptor Gaetano Russo as part of New York's 1892 commemoration of the 4th centenary of the discovery of the America - located at Columbus Circle New York - from wikipedia

Columbus Circle, named for Christopher Columbus, is a major landmark and point of attraction in the New York City borough of Manhattan. Completed in 1905. It is the point from which distances from New York City are measured. The traffic circle was designed by William P. Eno, a businessman who pioneered many early innovations in road safety and traffic control, as part of Frederick Law Olmsted‘s vision for the park, which included a “Grand Circle” at Merchants’ Gate, its most important Eighth Avenue entrance.

(roughly quoted from wikipedia entry about it found here – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Columbus_Circle )

The monument at the center, created by Italian sculptor Gaetano Russo,[1] is the point at which distances to and from New York City are officially measured. It was erected as part of New York’s 1892 commemoration of the 4th centenary of the discovery of the America. Constructed with funds raised by Il Progresso, a New York City-based Italian-language newspaper, the monument consists of a marble statue of Columbus atop a 70-foot (21 m) granite rostral column decorated with bronze reliefs representing Columbus’ ships: the Niña, the Pinta, and the Santa María. Its pedestal features an angel holding a globe.

(etc.)

1907 Photograph of Columbus Circle, the statue of Christopher Columbus and Central Park in New York City - wikipedia

1907 Photograph of Columbus Circle, the statue of Christopher Columbus and Central Park in New York City - wikipedia

My Note –

Which means that I’m going to have to go back to New York and hunt down that other durn sculpture in Central Park to get some pictures . . .

Yep – that’s a fact.

And, it is also true – that learning is a process which must invariably host some mistakes but it just means they need to be fixed, or corrected, or in this case – discovered by continuing the learning process until I could tell which part I had wrong – and then correcting it. But, I wouldn’t trade the process for the world. It is well worth it.

What a fun set of discovery to have enjoyed tonight. And, so much more to learn yet. So many exceptional and beautiful things have been created in the world. And, so many wondrous people have lived in it and are living in it now.

On my searches, I happened upon a couple other nifty things which were absolutely amazing, including more of the work by John La Farge and the Guastavino Tile Works and other Faience companies, the vaulted structural and decorative tile works which I had never realized were a structural element as well – and they are fireproofing, too. And, they are beautiful. The hope had been that people would be more comforted as they made use of the subway systems in particular because they are underground. That is some amazing thinking right there.

Grueby Company tile work done at Columbus Circle was the first done on the stations as this very elaborate placques of one of the Columbus ships and ornate decorative elements

Grueby Company tile work done at Columbus Circle was the first done on the stations as this very elaborate placques of one of the Columbus ships and ornate decorative elements - New York City - from roger shepherd site

It’s caption reads:

Columbus Circle was the first station ready for tile, so the Grueby Company tested its various types here. These frames and cornice are very elaborate–rosettes joined by nautical line and garlands of fruit tied with flowing ribbons.

http://rogershepherd.com/WIW/solution2/72nd3.html#gustavino

And, I’m not sure of this person’s relationship to anything, but recognizing the famous name when looking in the Who’s Who in America book from 1903 on google books, I found this entry which has absolutely blown me away for what it contains about this person and their accomplishments –

Langley, Samuel Pierpont, astronomer and physicist, Sec. the Smithsonian Inst’n since 1887; b. Roxbury, Boston, aug. 22, 1834; grad. Boston High School; (D.c. L., Oxford; D. Sc., Cambridge, Eng.; LL.D., Harvard, Princiton, Yale, Univ. Wis.; Univ. of Mich.; Ph.D., Stevens Inst. Technology).

Practiced architecture and civ. eng’ring; asst. Harvard Observatory, 1865; Inter asst. prof. mathematics U.S. Naval Acad.; dir. Allegheny Observatory, 1867, where, 1869, he founded the system of railway time service from observatories, which has since become general, and where he devised the bolometer, now in general use, and other apparatus.

Organized expdn. to Mt. Whitney, 1881, where he reestablished the color constant and discovered an entirely unsuspected extension of the invisible spectrum. Has carried out extended expts. on the problem of mech. flight.

Established Astrophysical Observatory and the Nat. Zool. Park, Washington. Corr. Inst. of France, foreign mem. Royal Soc. of London, Royal Society of Edinburgh, and Accademia Del Lincei, Rome; member Nat. Acad of Sciences and of many other American and foreign scientific societies. has been awarded Janssen medal, Inst. of France: Rumford medal of the royal Soc. of London, and of Am. Acad. Arts and Sciences; Henry Draper medal. Nat. Acad. Sciences, etc., and numerous others.

Author: The New Astronomy; Researches on Solar Heat; Experiments in Aerodynamics; Internal Work of the Wind, and many other scientific works, papers and mag. articles. Residence: Metropolitan Club, Washington.

(1903 entry – Who’s Who in America)

see link to google book – pg. 865 google doc / pg. 870 of actual book

Who’s who in America

By John William Leonard, Albert Nelson Marquis (1903)

Who’s Who in America (1903) – on google books

**

Just amazing . . .

I would say it doesn’t take much to entertain me, but actually it does. This has been genuinely entertaining, inspiring and fun. Better than television.

– cricketdiane

***

Advertisements
Comments
One Response to “New York Historical Context of Space and Buildings – The New York Genealogical and Biographical Society founding”
Trackbacks
Check out what others are saying...
  1. […] herald building newyorkcitycricketguide.wordpress.com […]



Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: